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Jistmi

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 
I burn my skin at least once a week if not more! I'm so frustrated and wondering if I can really do this. It's not bad burns probably first degree but with this frequency should I just call it quits and chalk it up to too clumsy or too blonde maybe....
dingdong

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #2 
When I learnt metalsmithing, I burnt myself a lot. Not so much for the glass but it's essentially the same - fire, heat. Don't give up, you'll get there. It's just a learning curve. There's multiple things one has to think about when playing with fire.
One thing I did learn was to cover the burns up fast. Cool it with water then stick a sticky plaster on it. The air makes it hurt longer, so, cover it up and it won't be sore. Use the fibre plasters as you can still have some sensory through them and they're not as dangerous, or slippery, as the plastic plasters... when you're working close to a torch that is.
Jistmi

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you soo much for the encouragement! I think one thing that is so hard for me is that I started out in silversmith as well and never burned myself once but since this torch is a whole lot bigger and kagilillion times hotter it must snuff out the brain cells that are supposed to keep my skin as pale as a Scot's skin is supposed to be and without as many hills and valleys.


I so appreciate the words of encouragement! Although it's hard to say thank you for the words of encouragement, Dingdong LOL.
dingdong

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Posts: 5
Reply with quote  #4 

Your welcome. I'm a beginner at glass too and that's why I've called myself dingdong on here, because its the 'aha' moments with ALL the mistakes I make (its the door bell ring, or sometimes the flat pancake on my face). There's a few. Lol. 

Everyone goes through their own learning curves, whatever they are. It'll pass and you'll get better. [smile]  

 

frog_dragon

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Posts: 1
Reply with quote  #5 
I teach lampwork and most beginners burn themselves frequently but this too shall pass!  I use clear nail polish on the burn usually two coats allowing each to dry between applications.  Stops the burn, doesn't hurt even near the flame and no mess, no blisters!  You can get back to work as soon as the polish dries.

Catfishunter

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Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #6 
Thin Kevlar thumb whole sleeves and gloves for a year now. I would have had a few bad ones and a lot of minor ones. With even a minor burn it is destacting and alters your mood leading to a slow learning experience. Only took about a week to get used to them. now sometimes I'll jump into flameworking and suddenly find myself feeling like I'm doing 90mph on a 6 lane road in rush hour without a belt on then I realize I missing my Kevlar and my hands are on hot glass. It also really helps with the heat when melting in a hot vack stack or color mixing.
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