To view all forums, you must register or sign in.
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
Dydez

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello to all who might read this. I am about to embark on the journey of learning Lampworking with Boro. I'm in Australia and everything is WAY more expensive here. I've got everything I need to start bar a kiln. I bought a Paragon kiln about 4 months ago, and to cut a long story short, after being jerked around and being very patient the supplier has now disappointed me and given me a refund so I'm back to square one and facing a price increase as well as a large drop in the $AU exchange rate [frown]
My question to all of you lampworking wizards is: Do I have to take the work directly from the flame into the annealing kiln or is there a way to safely cool pieces and anneal them as a batch later?
I have a large kiln but not within arms reach so to speak. It's in our pottery shed out the back away from the studio.
Any advice would be most great-fully appreciated.
Kind regards,
Dydez.
Fine Folly

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,222
Reply with quote  #2 
Boro is much more stable than COE 104.  You can let simple pieces cool, and then batch anneal them.   Here are pics of boro items that I did not anneal.  They did not crack.  You must make sure your joins are fluid, with no creases, as creases cause cracks in boro work.

Below the images are some comments on batch annealing Boro from those who do it.
1st Blue Dragon 100-3.5.jpg  Pink Peach Rose 100-3.25.jpg  *Panda 100.jpg 

FIRST COMMENT:
You can [batch anneal boro] to a certain point, and you'll find that point. Small round objects usually cool and batch anneal nicely later, BUT anything that took a lot of time, larger pieces that are assembled from component pieces and with appendages, I make sure to put into a hot kiln for annealing.

SECOND COMMENT:
As stated, small pieces will generally be fine. However, certain colors will crack if not placed into a hot kiln. I have let boro beads set out for weeks to months without issue.The ones that crack will usually crack during the slow cooling cycle when you are using a ceramic fiber blanket (a fiber blanket is not a substitute for proper annealing).  Sometimes a clear core helps, other times it does not.


__________________
Kristina

http://www.FineFolly.com & http://www.etsy.com/shop/FineFolly
Dydez

Registered:
Posts: 2
Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you all very much. Wish me luck on my voyage of discovery!
Cheers.
Kind regards,
Dydez [smile]
Fine Folly

Avatar / Picture

Registered:
Posts: 1,222
Reply with quote  #4 
Be sure to post some of your work!
__________________
Kristina

http://www.FineFolly.com & http://www.etsy.com/shop/FineFolly
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.